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INTL Tentative Course Offerings

The International Studies Program offers courses throughout the academic year, including two core courses and the capstone seminar.  All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better.  Should you have additional questions, please e-mail us at isp@ucsd.edu or send a message through the Virtual Advising Center.

Note: The tentative schedule of course offerings is subject to change.

Academic Year 2016-2017

Fall 2016

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Haggard, Stephan
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190H
Honors Seminar in International Studies

Gilson, Nancy
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

INTL 190
Political Boundaries: Cross-Border Flows

Nadkarni, Vidya
Political Science (USD)

What do inter-state boundaries signify in twenty-first century international politics? Do they represent lines of political and legal division separating citizens from foreigners or have boundaries been rendered invisible by the movement of people and trade across borders?  Transnational challenges dealing with the environment, drugs, human migration, and terrorism do not stop at borders.  How may we conceptualize borders that serve both as lines of division and points of exchange? Drawing on historical examples from around the world, this will examine cross border flows of people, goods, ideas, and all manner of natural and human-induced challenges.

INTL 190
Syrian Refugee Crisis in International Perspective

Major, Ivan
Economics

The current Syrian refugee/migration crisis in the European Union (EU) put the issues of migration in the spotlight in Europe but also in the US. This course will discuss the reasons, and the short-term and long-term consequences of migration into Europe and into the United States. We shall address migration in an international comparative perspective. Students will receive an introduction to the economic, political and social (sociological) approaches and theories of migration, but they will also be required to work autonomously on different aspects of migration and especially those of migration crises. You will be acquainted with the basic facts, then with the analytical methods how to analyze and discuss important social issues, such as, e.g., the problems of immigration, from different perspectives. We shall focus on data collection, on different statistical, econometrics methods and on building models for our analysis.

INTL 190
Contemporary Political and Policy Challenges in Latin America

Desposato, Scott
History

TBA

INTL 190
Democracy and Economic Change in Latin America

Samstad, James
Political Science (SDSU)

In recent decades, Latin America has been seen as experiencing a resurgence. Once plagued by authoritarianism and economic stagnation, many countries in the region have undergone a relatively successful process of democratization while achieving solid rates of overall economic growth. This senior seminar will examine the process of democratization and the implementation of economic liberalization programs in contemporary Latin America. Issues that will be explored include problems of economic instability, ongoing inequality, excessive presidentialism, and limited popular participation, with a focus on the nations of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico. As a core requirement of the seminar, students will be expected to write a "capstone" research paper on a topic related to the main themes of the course.

Winter 2017

INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Vitz, Matthew

History

Preliminary course description: Global Warming (or in broader terms, climate change) will be the greatest single challenge facing our world in the 21st century. One, in fact, could argue that climate change already is the greatest challenge we will face, even though it remains on the margins of public political discourse in most countries. This class seeks to interrogate the term "Anthropocene" by historicizing it and critically examining the economic models, social power, and inequalities that have given rise to and shaped this new era. You will learn about the utilitarian and conquest conceptions of nature that environmentalists have long sought to overturn, early preservation and conservation movements, the rise of modern environmentalism and ecological thinking, sustainable development paradigms, and environmental justice movements, among other ideas.

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Broz, Lawrence

Political Science

This course examines the evolution of the world economy from the late nineteenth century to the present. The purpose is to describe the historical trends in the international economy and explain the causes and the consequences of these trends. Students will come away with the basic tools they need to understand the world economy and the politics of international economic relations.

INTL 190
Topics in Economic Development - South Asia

Bharadwaj, Prashant

Economics

What factors contribute to the persistent levels of under development in South Asian countries like India and Pakistan, and what policies can help in their development? We will focus on factors such as institutional history (in particular the role of colonization and the legacy of the partition), high levels of fertility, poor health, and lack of technology adoption as sources of South Asian under development. 

INTL 190
Topics in Economic Development - Africa

Bharadwaj, Prashant

Economics

What factors contribute to the persistent levels of under development in African countries like Kenya and Ghana, and what policies can help in their development? We will focus on factors such as institutional history (in particular the role of colonization and the history of the slave trade), high levels of fertility, poor health, lack of technology adoption and low levels of literacy as sources of African under development. 

INTL 190
Why Do Europeans Love and Hate America? Americanization and Anti-Americanism

Patterson, Patrick

History

"Americanization" and 'McDonalization" in Europe spark controversy and even violent protests. Many treat imports of American culture with disgust. Yet the US is also admired, even loved, and demand for American things remains strong. We will study key forms of an resistance to Americanization.

INTL 190
Mexico: Drugs, Democracy, and Development

Lettieri, Michael

History

Mexico is a paradox. It is the United States’ third largest trading partner and the most popular foreign destination for U.S. tourists, but it is also a country in crisis where drug cartels hang tortured bodies from bridges and corrupt politicians join the ranks of international fugitives sought by Interpol. How do we reconcile these dual realities? How do we explain why Mexico has become one of the most violent places in the world, and why it has proven so difficult to stop the bleeding? This course will explore how Mexico’s authoritarian past and recent transition to democracy have shaped its present challenges, examining contemporary political and human rights issues and discussing solutions. Taught by Dr. Michael Lettieri, from the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute, the course will offer a dynamic look at Mexico today. 

INTL 190
Always a Foreigner: Travel Literature & Misunderstandings

Gilson, Nancy

The School of Global Policy and Strategy

Why do we travel and, most especially, why do the most serious travelers (not vacationers) prefer to travel by themselves, seeking out places that will point out exactly how alone they are? They arrive with no suitable language, little idea of what they will find, and with the brightest hope that they will discover both the truth about the place and the truth about themselves in that place. But, the great American writer, Herman Melville cautions such a traveler when he describes a far off island that is home to one of the sailors in Moby Dick: “It is not down on any map; true places never are.”

In this course, we will read travel essays, memoirs, and novels, all written before the resort to a Rough Guide and the internet. What happens when “outsiders” choose to go into the desert in search of an oasis? When they look for the “lost heart” of someplace they have never been? How do they write about what they do not know and, for lack of language, cannot understand? And how has this writing shaped what the rest of us think we know about places we have never been? We will read literature on Africa, Europe, Latin America, the US, and Asia.

INTL 190
The Political Economy of Global Energy

Herberg, Mikkal

The School of Global Policy and Strategy

This course will analyze the geopolitics and economics of the global energy industry and markets. The themes will revolve around the search for energy security through cooperation or competition, the complex interaction between the economics and politics of energy markets, and the challenges of sustainable energy development. The course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of the global energy industry followed by a survey of the functioning of the global energy markets and investments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the oil industry due its pivotal role in global energy use, pricing, and geopolitics. The course will analyze the concept of energy security and the politics of energy policy in today’s highly politicized, volatile energy markets. The focus will then turn to a survey of the nexus between energy and the environment, the concept of a sustainable energy development, and the political economy of carbon emissions and climate change.

Spring 2017

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Gilson, Nancy
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Walter, Barbara
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190
Corruption

Niehaus, Paul
Economics

The goal of the course is to better understand corruption in developing countries today: why it occurs, what the consequences are, and what can or should be done about it.  We will draw on readings from economics, political science and sociology, and from Dr. Niehaus' work advising emerging market governments and building GiveDirectly and Segovia.

INTL 190
Film & Literature of the Global South

Cancel, Robert
Literature

The senior seminar will focus on literature by several authors from Africa, Haiti, and Cuba as well as cinema from those and other regions. Themes of resistance to colonialism and postcolonial corruption and repression will be at the center of class material.

INTL 190
60 Years of European Integration: Overview and Challenges

Guichard, Stephanie
Economics

This seminar will review the European integration process over the past 60 years, providing a history since the mid-50s, an overview of the key European Institutions of governance and politics. We will discuss the achievements and challenges faced by Europe in various areas including the common currency, macroeconomic policies, movements of people inside Europe and across its external borders, labor market and social issues, movements of goods, movements of capital, energy policy, industrial policy. Hot topics such the Greek crisis, the future of the Euro, Brexit, the refugee crisis will be covered during those sessions. Comparative data will present the situation across the different European countries, and compare it with the rest of the world, especially the US.

INTL 190
The Anatomy of a Deal: Technology Meets New Media

Auerbach, Brad
LinkedIn Profile

Brad Auerbach is a senior business executive with extensive and unique expertise in Intellectual Property law and licensing, business development, marketing, and content acquisition for new technologies, on a global level. He has has success in structuring many groundbreaking deals with a diverse range of rights holders, including NFL, HBO, MTV, ESPN, etc. He has deep familiarity with each aspect of media business, having sat on all sides of the deal-making table, on behalf of mobile, distribution and production companies. As a member if the California State Bar, Mr. Auerbach has held senior positions at HP, Qualcomm and Disney.

This course will examine the issues that permeate the current technology and media landscape. As a means to reveal the ongoing challenges in this landscape, we will examine three industries that have undergone tectonic changes over the last few decades: music, video and computer. It is at the intersection of these industries that some of the most intriguing developments and hence the most innovative deals are being made. We will analyze several of these issues through an international lens, to examine nuances particular to certain territories. 

INTL 190
Issues in US National Security

Coyle, James
Political Science (Pepperdine/Chapman)

This course provides a review of the National Security Strategy of the United States. It pays particular attention to the elements of national power, and the role of International Law in the creation and maintenance of America's security and freedom, especially in light of transnational threats. 

INTL 190
Democratic Institutions in Comparative Perspective: The Politics of Political Representation and Economic Inequality

Feeley, Maureen
Political Science

What do we mean by “democracy”?  What are the dominant institutional forms of democracy in our world today, and what difference does this make for political representation and policy outcomes?  This senior capstone seminar will introduce students to contemporary theoretical and empirical debates on democracy and democratization, with a specific focus on the relationship between political representation and economic inequality.  For their thesis project, students will choose a contemporary problem of inequality of particular interest to them in a democratic, or democratizing, country of their choice (the United States may be used as a comparative case study), and analyze dominant political institutional sources of this problem. 

INTL 190
International Refugee Law and Policy

Kshatryia, Krista
Juris Doctor; LinkedIn Profile

International refugee policy determines the fate of 24 million displaced people and how the global community treats some of our most vulnerable members.  In this course, we research the historical context, legal issues, and current policies impacting refugees around the world.  In so doing, students will gain in-depth and interdisciplinary knowledge of: (1) refugee and asylum law, (2) the interaction of domestic and international institutions, and (3) the interplay between federal law, policy, and administration.  This course also provides a foundation of legal studies through court case analysis and argument.

Summer 2017

Course Name Faculty and Description

 

INTL 190
Sports and Social Justice

Gagnon, Jeffrey
Dimensions of Culture Program, UCSD

In this International Studies seminar, students will explore the complex relationships between sports and social justice from an interdisciplinary perspective. Central to the study of sports in society are the ways in which athletic competition shapes the identities of people across diverse social groups (race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, nation, citizenship and ability) within the context of larger social and cultural forces. Students will explore case studies and policies in various international contexts to understand how sports around the world can be both an expression of social injustice and an important instrument in its studies. This seminar will provide an opportunity for students to think deeply about the power and potential of sports in the movement for social change around the globe.

Academic Year 2015-2016

Fall 2015

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Postero, Nancy
Anthropology

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 190H
Honors Seminar in International Studies

Feeley, Maureen
Political Science

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

INTL 190
Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights

Gilson, Nancy
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

The equality of women can be measured neither in terms of a single marker- for example, access to the vote, public office or economic mobility- nor in the same way around the globe. “Patriarchy.” “sexism” or, even, “misogyny” are not and have never been uni-dimensional or uniform in their mechanisms or affects. Gender inequality is, in fact, a “collection of disparate and interlinked phenomenon” that effect women profoundly and in markedly different ways around the world. Paradoxically, trying to erase it in one realm- for example in education or work- can encourage its worsening it in others, as we often see in increased levels of socially sanctioned gendered violence.

This course will be a survey of the state of gender equality around the world. We will begin with taking up the theoretical question of how to assess inequality in different cultural contexts and consider the state of comparative research on gender. We will then look at the state of the law, education, health and wellbeing, access to employment and property, levels and nature of violence, the implications of the feminization of immigration, and challenges to gender roles and norms in different cultural contexts. Our goal will be to break inequality into a collection of coherent and manageable “problems” that allow us to see the complex and, sometimes, contradictory ways that societal institutions create, perpetuate and, ultimately are able to end gender inequality. We will consider what states and international institutions are doing and not doing to establish the equality of women.

INTL 190
Political Boundaries: Contested Borders in International Politics

Nadkarni, Vidya
Political Science (USD)

This course will examine why the borders of territorially bounded states are contested by reviewing reasons offered by states for border claims. We will look at case studies drawn from countries with disputed borders in Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America. We will also explore the security, economic, and ecological implications of contested borders by looking at problems of refugee and immigrant populations in and around border regions, economic underdevelopment and securitization of all issues in border regions, and how states involved in border disputes arbitrate between the competing claims of security and economic development in border regions.

INTL 190
Urban Poverty in Historical Context

Kwak, Nancy
History

INTL 190
Democracy and Economic Change in Latin America

Samstad, James
Political Science (SDSU)

In recent decades, Latin America has been seen as experiencing a resurgence. Once plagued by authoritarianism and economic stagnation, many countries in the region have undergone a relatively successful process of democratization while achieving solid rates of overall economic growth. This senior seminar will examine the process of democratization and the implementation of economic liberalization programs in contemporary Latin America. Issues that will be explored include problems of economic instability, ongoing inequality, excessive presidentialism, and limited popular participation, with a focus on the nations of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico. As a core requirement of the seminar, students will be expected to write a "capstone" research paper on a topic related to the main themes of the course.

Winter 2016

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Broz, J. Lawrence
Political Science

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190
Topics in Economic Development

Bharadwaj, Prashant
Economics

TBA

INTL 190
Partition of British India

Bharadwaj, Prashant
Economics

This course will attempt to provide an understanding of the partition of British India in August 1947 from the perspective of economics, demography, history, literature and film. Through these different perspectives, the course will provide a broad understanding of some of the facts about this momentous event in world and South Asian history and also address how these facts are remembered and interpreted in popular culture through literature and film.

INTL 190
Comparative Democratic Development: Power-Sharing Institutions in Ethnically Divided States

Feeley, Maureen
Political Science

Do power sharing institutions, as opposed to power concentrating or power dividing institutions, facilitate or hinder democratic transitions in ethnically divided societies? This question has divided contemporary scholars and policymakers alike, and is the central focus of this research seminar. In examining this question, we will consider case studies of successful and failed democratic transitions from three regions of the world: Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and the Middle East. For each case study, we will examine the impact of different institutional configurations on democratic transitions/processes of democratization.

INTL 190
The Political Economy of Global Energy

Herberg, Mikkal
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

This course will analyze the geopolitics and economics of the global energy industry and markets. The themes will revolve around the search for energy security through cooperation or competition, the complex interaction between the economics and politics of energy markets, and the challenges of sustainable energy development. The course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of the global energy industry followed by a survey of the functioning of the global energy markets and investments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the oil industry due its pivotal role in global energy use, pricing, and geopolitics. The course will analyze the concept of energy security and the politics of energy policy in today’s highly politicized, volatile energy markets. The focus will then turn to a survey of the nexus between energy and the environment, the concept of a sustainable energy development, and the political economy of carbon emissions and climate change.

INTL 190
Literature and Film of the Global South After the Fall of the Soviet Union

Cancel, Robert
Literature

TBA

INTL 196H
Honors Seminar in International Studies
Faculty Advisors

For seniors who have completed INTL 190H.  Completion of an honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the UCSD faculty. * Please refer to the Honors Program Requirements.

Spring 2016

Course Name Faculty and Description

INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Gilson, Nancy
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 190
Political Economy of Globalization

Coyle, James
Political Science (Pepperdine/Chapman)

This course provides a review of the National Security Strategy of the United States. It pays particular attention to the elements of national power, and the role of International Law in the creation and maintenance of America's security and freedom, especially in light of transnational threats. 

INTL 190
States, Markets and Societies in East Asia

Naoi, Megumi
Political Science

The aim of this senior seminar is to help international studies majors complete a major research project on the relationship among governments, markets, and societies in East Asia, broadly defined to include Northeast and Southeast Asia. Two questions motivate the course: (i) How do economic interest groups and social groups affect government policy? (ii) How do politics affect economic and social outcomes (e.g., economic growth, cross-border flows of goods, capital, and labor, gender equality, ethnic divisions etc)? Examples of topics that may be covered in the paper are industrial policy, trade, finance, gender, ethnic and racial politics, the environment, and migration.

INTL 190
War and Peace in the Impossible Country - Yugoslavia: Before, During, and After

Patterson, Patrick
History

TBA

INTL 190
Socioeconomic Development of the Arab World

CANCELLED

Rauch, James
Economics

CANCELLED

NOTE: Students who have completed ECON 165. Economics of the Middle East are NOT allowed to enroll in this section of INTL 190 due to substantial content overlap.

We will discuss Arab socioeconomic development in comparison to other countries in the less and more developed worlds.

INTL 190
Corruption

Niehaus, Paul
Economics

The goal of the course is to better understand corruption in developing countries today: why it occurs, what the consequences are, and what can or should be done about it.  We will draw on readings from economics, political science and sociology, and from Dr. Niehaus' work advising emerging market governments and building GiveDirectly and Segovia.

INTL 190
Anatomy of a Deal: Technology Meets New Media

Auerbach, Brad
LinkedIn Profile

Brad Auerbach has worked at several global technology companies (Philips, Qualcomm, HP) in senior business development positions, and started his career at Disney in business affairs. He has crafted innovative deals with every Hollywood studio, the major record labels and most of the professional sports leagues, among many others. 

This course will examine the issues that permeate the current technology and media landscape. As a means to reveal the ongoing challenges in this landscape, we will examine three industries that have undergone tectonic changes over the last few decades: music, video and computer. It is at the intersection of these industries that some of the most intriguing developments and hence the most innovative deals are being made. The goal of the class is twofold: (1) to provide an understanding of the evolving media and technology landscape and (2) to ensure familiarity with the real world issues involved in conducting business deals.

Summer 2016

Departmental Course Offerings

All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better.  Should you have additional questions, please send your inquiry through the Virtual Advising Center.

Each quarter, the Schedule of Classes for the following quarter is released on Friday of Week 5. After the Schedule of Classes has posted, International Studies advisors will compile a list of approved International Studies courses offered by other departments to assist students in selecting appropriate courses. It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they are enrolled in courses that apply toward the International Studies major.

Academic Year 2016-2017

Fall 2016

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Departmental Course Offerings:

Please note that the Schedule of Classes is subject to change.

Winter 2017

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Departmental Course Offerings:

Please note that the Schedule of Classes is subject to change.

Spring 2017

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Departmental Course Offerings:

Summer 2017

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better. It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements. 

Departmental Course Offerings:

Please note that the Schedule of Classes is subject to change.

Academic Year 2015-2016

Fall 2015

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Departmental Course Offerings:

Please note that the Schedule of Classes is subject to change.

Winter 2016

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Departmental Course Offerings:

Please note that the Schedule of Classes is subject to change.

Spring 2016

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Departmental Course Offerings:

Please note that the Schedule of Classes is subject to change.

Summer 2016

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Departmental Course Offerings:

Please note that the Schedule of Classes is subject to change.

Archives

Academic Year 2014-2015

Fall 2014

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 190
The Cultural Cold War

Edelman, Robert
History

Beyond the political-military confrontation, this seminar encourages a deeper investigation in the Cold War cultural diplomacy. Students will read scholarly work that covers the concept of soft power used by the great superpowers (the USA and the USSR) mobilized writers, dancers, musicians, film-makers, athletes, artists and playwrights in the effort to win the favor of their own people and that of the rest of the world. [syllabus]

INTL 190
States, Markets and Societies in East Asia

Naoi, Megumi
Political Science

The aim of this senior seminar is to help international studies majors complete a major research project on the relationship among governments, markets, and societies in East Asia, broadly defined to include Northeast and Southeast Asia. Two questions motivate the course: (i) How do economic interest groups and social groups affect government policy? (ii) How do politics affect economic and social outcomes (e.g., economic growth, cross-border flows of goods, capital, and labor, gender equality, ethnic divisions etc)? Examples of topics that may be covered in the paper are industrial policy, trade, finance, gender, ethnic and racial politics, the environment, and migration.

INTL 190

Political Economy of Globalization

Samstad, James
Political Science (SDSU)

This seminar will examine both the positive and negative repercussions of the phenomenon known as “globalization.” It will begin with a discussion of the competing definitions of globalization, as well as its historical development and forces driving it. The seminar will then turn to some of the controversies and concrete impacts of greater economic and cultural exchange, along with discussions of how globalization has reshaped the role of the nation-state, and what, if anything, should be done to regulate the process of economic integration.

INTL 190
Peace and War in the Modern Age

Statler, Kathryn
History (USD)

The central theme of this course is the seemingly contradictory nature of the 20th century. On the one hand, humankind took momentous steps toward recognizing universal human rights and attempting to ensure peace and security for nations and citizens. On the other hand, the twentieth century witnessed not one but two world wars, a Cold War that lasted forty-five years, and horrendous violations of human rights, not to mention massive loss of life. How do we reconcile this contradiction?  Ultimately, we will be looking at getting to peace through war. [syllabus]

INTL 190H

Honors Seminar in International Studies

Gilson, Nancy
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

Winter 2015

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Broz, J. Lawrence
Political Science

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190
Topics in Economic Development

Bharadwaj, Prashant
Economics

TBA

INTL 190
The Partition of British India

Bharadwaj, Prashant
Economics

This course will attempt to provide an understanding of the partition of British India in August 1947 from the perspective of economics, demography, history, literature and film. Through these different perspectives, the course will provide a broad understanding of some of the facts about this momentous event in world and South Asian history and also address how these facts are remembered and interpreted in popular culture through literature and film.

INTL 190
Comparative Health Systems

Clemens, Jeffrey
Economics

The comparative study of international healthcare systems inevitably reveals intriguing contrasts, rooted from the individual country's unique set of economic and social values. How should countries organize and pay for health care? The relentless rise of health care costs requires global policy makers to confront precisely these questions.  This course takes a comparative approach to learn from the failures and successes of health systems around the world.  For your capstone research paper, you will conduct an in depth exploration of a hot policy topic in the health system of your choice.

INTL 190
African American Internationalism

Graham, Jessica
History

One of the world's most famous campaigns for social justice was launched by African Americans during the 20th century. The African American social justice movement both influenced and was influenced by geopolitics and similar movements in other parts of the world. In this course, we will examine the personal, ideological, and foreign policy connections between U.S. Blacks, their struggle for equality, and the international community. Topics to be covered include: The role of the Cold War in the Civil Rights Movement, links between U.S. Blacks and Asia; and the African American fight against South African apartheid.

INTL 190
The Political Economy of Global Energy

Herberg, Mikkal
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

This course will analyze the geopolitics and economics of the global energy industry and markets. The themes will revolve around the search for energy security through cooperation or competition, the complex interaction between the economics and politics of energy markets, and the challenges of sustainable energy development. The course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of the global energy industry followed by a survey of the functioning of the global energy markets and investments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the oil industry due its pivotal role in global energy use, pricing, and geopolitics. The course will analyze the concept of energy security and the politics of energy policy in today’s highly politicized, volatile energy markets. The focus will then turn to a survey of the nexus between energy and the environment, the concept of a sustainable energy development, and the political economy of carbon emissions and climate change.

INTL 190
Democracy and Economic Change in Latin America

Samstad, James
Political Science (SDSU)

In recent decades, Latin America has been seen as experiencing a resurgence. Once plagued by authoritarianism and economic stagnation, many countries in the region have undergone a relatively successful process of democratization while achieving solid rates of overall economic growth. This senior seminar will examine the process of democratization and the implementation of economic liberalization programs in contemporary Latin America. Issues that will be explored include problems of economic instability, ongoing inequality, excessive presidentialism, and limited popular participation, with a focus on the nations of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico. As a core requirement of the seminar, students will be expected to write a "capstone" research paper on a topic related to the main themes of the course.

INTL 196H
Honors Seminar in International Studies
Faculty Advisors

For seniors who have completed INTL 190H.  Completion of an honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the UCSD faculty. * Please refer to the Honors Program Requirements.

Spring 2015

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Gilson, Nancy
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 190
Comparative Health Systems

Clemens, Jeffrey
Economics

The comparative study of international healthcare systems inevitably reveals intriguing contrasts, rooted from the individual country's unique set of economic and social values. How should countries organize and pay for health care? The relentless rise of health care costs requires global policy makers to confront precisely these questions.  This course takes a comparative approach to learn from the failures and successes of health systems around the world.  For your capstone research paper, you will conduct an in depth exploration of a hot policy topic in the health system of your choice.

INTL 190
Issues in U.S. National Security

Coyle, James
Political Science (Pepperdine/Chapman)

The goal of this class is to examine what is U.S. national security policy, how does it differ from other countries, how it is formed and implemented. Specifically, we will address issues such as: On what values is national security policy based? How true is national security policy to those values?  What is the role of international law in validating or constraining national security policy? How does globalization affect national security policy? The course concentrates primarily—but not exclusively—on Europe and former Soviet bloc countries.

INTL 190
Political Extremism in Europe

Fisk, David
Political Science

TBA

INTL 190
Political Boundaries: Contested Borders in International Politics

Nadkarni, Vidya
Political Science (USD)

This course will examine why the borders of territorially bounded states are contested by reviewing reasons offered by states for border claims. We will look at case studies drawn from countries with disputed borders in Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America. We will also explore the security, economic, and ecological implications of contested borders by looking at problems of refugee and immigrant populations in and around border regions, economic underdevelopment and securitization of all issues in border regions, and how states involved in border disputes arbitrate between the competing claims of security and economic development in border regions.

Summer 2015

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 190
How to Steal an Election

Gibson, Clark
Political Science, ISP Director

TBA

Academic Year 2013-2014

Fall 2013

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Postero, Nancy
Anthropology

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 190
Comparative Health Systems

Clemens, Jeffrey
Economics

The comparative study of international healthcare systems inevitably reveals intriguing contrasts, rooted from the individual country's unique set of economic and social values. How should countries organize and pay for health care? The relentless rise of health care costs requires global policy makers to confront precisely these questions.  This course takes a comparative approach to learn from the failures and successes of health systems around the world.  For your capstone research paper, you will conduct an in depth exploration of a hot policy topic in the health system of your choice.

INTL 190
Housing in the Developing World

Kwak, Nancy
History

The twin goals of this course are to introduce you to some of the major housing problems of the developing world and to get you researching a subsection that interests you. We will examine the relationship between current-day housing problems with historical programs, plans, and political/social/economic contexts. We will compare national experiences, and think about what principles of policymaking we might extract. Our point of view will change from week to week: sometimes we will look at these problems from the perspective of government officials, planners, and architects; other weeks, we will think about what it is like to actually live in these cities as upper-, middle-, and working-class residents. Above all else, we will think about who profits and who loses when housing changes.

INTL 190
Political Boundaries: Contested Borders in International Politics

Nadkarni, Vidya
Political Science (USD)

This course will examine why the borders of territorially bounded states are contested by reviewing reasons offered by states for border claims. We will look at case studies drawn from countries with disputed borders in Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America. We will also explore the security, economic, and ecological implications of contested borders by looking at problems of refugee and immigrant populations in and around border regions, economic underdevelopment and securitization of all issues in border regions, and how states involved in border disputes arbitrate between the competing claims of security and economic development in border regions.

INTL 190
Political Economy of Globalization

Samstad, James
Political Science (SDSU)

This seminar will examine both the positive and negative repercussions of the phenomenon known as “globalization.” It will begin with a discussion of the competing definitions of globalization, as well as its historical development and forces driving it. The seminar will then turn to some of the controversies and concrete impacts of greater economic and cultural exchange, along with discussions of how globalization has reshaped the role of the nation-state, and what, if anything, should be done to regulate the process of economic integration.

INTL 190H
Honors Seminar in International Studies

Feeley, Maureen
Political Science

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.


Winter 2014

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Haggard, Stephan
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190
Comparative Democratic Development

Feeley, Maureen
Political Science

Do power sharing institutions, as opposed to power concentrating or power dividing institutions, facilitate or hinder democratic transitions in ethnically divided societies? This question has divided contemporary scholars and policymakers alike, and is the central focus of this research seminar. In examining this question, we will consider case studies of successful and failed democratic transitions from three regions of the world: Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and the Middle East. For each case study, we will examine the impact of different institutional configurations on democratic transitions/processes of democratization.

INTL 190
Democracy and Dictatorship in Africa

Gibson, Clark
Political Science, ISP Director

This course will cover topics in contemporary African politics as they relate to the development of the African state in comparative perspective, including state formation; nationalism and the struggle for independence; civil wars, genocide, and under-development; democratic transition, elections, and voting; economic growth; film and literature; gender and ethnicity; and corruption and terrorism.

INTL 190
African American Internationalism

Graham, Jessica
History

One of the world's most famous campaigns for social justice was launched by African Americans during the 20th century. The African American social justice movement both influenced and was influenced by geopolitics and similar movements in other parts of the world. In this course, we will examine the personal, ideological, and foreign policy connections between U.S. Blacks, their struggle for equality, and the international community. Topics to be covered include: The role of the Cold War in the Civil Rights Movement, links between U.S. Blacks and Asia; and the African American fight against South African apartheid.

INTL 190
The Political Economy of Global Energy

Herberg, Mikkal
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

This course will analyze the geopolitics and economics of the global energy industry and markets. The themes will revolve around the search for energy security through cooperation or competition, the complex interaction between the economics and politics of energy markets, and the challenges of sustainable energy development. The course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of the global energy industry followed by a survey of the functioning of the global energy markets and investments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the oil industry due its pivotal role in global energy use, pricing, and geopolitics. The course will analyze the concept of energy security and the politics of energy policy in today’s highly politicized, volatile energy markets. The focus will then turn to a survey of the nexus between energy and the environment, the concept of a sustainable energy development, and the political economy of carbon emissions and climate change.

INTL 190
Corruption

Niehaus, Paul
Economics

The goal of the course is to better understand corruption in developing countries today: why it occurs, what the consequences are, and what can or should be done about it.

INTL 190
Democracy and Economic Change in Latin America
Samstad, James
Political Science, SDSU

In recent decades, Latin America has been seen as experiencing a resurgence. Once plagued by authoritarianism and economic stagnation, many countries in the region have undergone a relatively successful process of democratization while achieving solid rates of overall economic growth. This senior seminar will examine the process of democratization and the implementation of economic liberalization programs in contemporary Latin America. Issues that will be explored include problems of economic instability, ongoing inequality, excessive presidentialism, and limited popular participation, with a focus on the nations of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico. As a core requirement of the seminar, students will be expected to write a "capstone" research paper on a topic related to the main themes of the course.
INTL 196H
Honors Seminar in International Studies
Faculty Advisors

For seniors who have completed INTL 190H.  Completion of an honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the UCSD faculty. * Please refer to the Honors Program Requirements.

Spring 2014

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Broz, J. Lawrence
Political Science

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190
Issues in U.S. National Security

Coyle, James
Political Science (Pepperdine/Chapman)

The goal of this class is to examine what is U.S. national security policy, how does it differ from other countries, how it is formed and implemented. Specifically, we will address issues such as: On what values is national security policy based?  How true is national security policy to those values?  What is the role of international law in validating or constraining national security policy? How does globalization affect national security policy? The course concentrates primarily—but not exclusively—on Europe and former Soviet bloc countries.

INTL 190
BICs

Kahler, Miles
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

We will not only consider the stance of Brazil, India, and China toward global governance institutions; students in the course will also be encouraged to investigate and compare the development strategies, political institutions, and foreign policies of these increasingly influential actors.

INTL 190
African American Internationalism

Graham, Jessica
History

One of the world's most famous campaigns for social justice was launched by African Americans during the 20th century. The African American social justice movement both influenced and was influenced by geopolitics and similar movements in other parts of the world. In this course, we will examine the personal, ideological, and foreign policy connections between U.S. Blacks, their struggle for equality, and the international community. Topics to be covered include: The role of the Cold War in the Civil Rights Movement, links between U.S. Blacks and Asia; and the African American fight against South African apartheid.

INTL 190
The Political Economy of Global Energy

Herberg, Mikkal
School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

This course will analyze the geopolitics and economics of the global energy industry and markets. The themes will revolve around the search for energy security through cooperation or competition, the complex interaction between the economics and politics of energy markets, and the challenges of sustainable energy development. The course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of the global energy industry followed by a survey of the functioning of the global energy markets and investments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the oil industry due its pivotal role in global energy use, pricing, and geopolitics. The course will analyze the concept of energy security and the politics of energy policy in today’s highly politicized, volatile energy markets. The focus will then turn to a survey of the nexus between energy and the environment, the concept of a sustainable energy development, and the political economy of carbon emissions and climate change.

INTL 190
Peace and War in the Modern Age

Statler, Kathryn
History (USD)

The central theme of this course is the seemingly contradictory nature of the 20th century. On the one hand, humankind took momentous steps toward recognizing universal human rights and attempting to ensure peace and security for nations and citizens. On the other hand, the twentieth century witnessed not one but two world wars, a Cold War that lasted forty-five years, and horrendous violations of human rights, not to mention massive loss of life. How do we reconcile this contradiction? Ultimately, we will be looking at getting to peace through war.

Academic Year 2012-2013

Fall 2012 

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Political Boundaries: Contested Borders in International Politics

Professor: James Rauch (Economics)

Topic: Socioeconomic Development in the Arab World

Professor: James Samstad (Political Science, SDSU)

Topic: Democracy and Economics Change in Latin America

Professor: John Skrentny (Sociology)

Topic: Comparative Immigration

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Maureen Feeley (Political Science)

Winter 2013 

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science) 

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: Issues of Economic (under)Development in South Asia

Professor: Maureen Feeley (Political Science)

Topic: Comparative Democratic Development: Power-Sharing Institutions in Ethnically Divided Societies

Professor: Mikkal Herberg (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

Topic: The Political Economy of Global Energy

Professor: Rebecca Klatch (Sociology)

Topic: Gender and Globalization

Professor: Patrick Patterson (History)

Topic: Yugoslavia: Before, During, After

Professor: Quinney, Kimber (Political Science, CSUSM)

Topic: Global Governance

Professor: Quinney, Nigel (Visiting)

Topic: History of Human Rights and Internationalism

Spring 2013

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Eli Elinoff (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: The Partition of British India

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Megumi Naoi (Political Science)

Topic: States, Markets, and Societies in East Asia

Professor: Paul Niehaus (Economics)

Topic: Corruption

Professor: Quinney, Kimber (Political Science, CSUSM)

Topic: A Comparative Analysis of Globalization

Professor: Schaede, Ulrike (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

Topic: Business and Society in Changing Japan

Academic Year 2011-2012

Fall 2011

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Nancy Postero (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Political Boundaries: Contested Borders in International Politics

Professor: John Skrentny (Sociology)

Topic: Comparative Immigration

Professor: Kathryn Statler (SDSU)

Topic: Peace and War in the Modern Age

Professor: James Rauch (Economics)

Topic: Socioeconomic Development in the Arab World

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Maureen Feeley (Political Science)

Winter 2012

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Sharon Rose (Linguistics)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: Issues of Economic (under)Development in South Asia

Professor: Robert Edelman (History)

Topic: Sports in the Cold War

Professor: Maureen Feeley (Political Science)

Topic: Comparative Democratic Development: Power-Sharing Institutions in Ethnically Divided Societies

Professor: Rebecca Klatch (Sociology)

Topic: Gender and Globalization

Professor: Paul Niehaus (Economics)

Topic: Corruption

Professor: Quinney, Kimber (Political Science, CSUSM)

Topic: History of Internationalism and Human Rights

Professor: Samstad, James (Visiting)

Topic: Democracy and Economic Change in Latin America

Spring 2012

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Claire Adida (Political Science)

Topic: Immigrant Exclusion Around the World

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: Issues of Economic (under)Development in South Asia

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Kimber Quinney (Political Science, CSUSM)

Topic: A Comparative Analysis of Globalization

Professor: Gershon Shafir (Sociology)

Topic: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Professor: Peter Smith (Political Science)

Topic: Democracy in the Developing World

Academic Year 2010-2011

Fall 2010

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Sharon Rose (Linguistics)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: Issues of Economic (under)Development in Africa

Professor: Theodore Groves (Economics)

Topic: International Economic Agreements

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Political Boundaries: Contested Borders in International Politics

Professor: Gershon Shafir (Sociology)

Topic: Human Rights in Action

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Maureen Feeley (Political Science)

Winter 2011

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Stephan Haggard (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: Issues of Economic (under)Development in South Asia

Professor: Maureen Feeley (Political Science)

Topic: Comparative Democratic Development: Power-Sharing Institutions in Ethnically Divided Societies

Professor: Karen Ferree (Political Science)

Topic: Politics of Africa

Professor: Theodore Groves (Economics)

Topic: International Economic Agreements

Professor: Kwak, Nancy (History)

Topic: Housing in the Developing World

Professor: Samstad, James (Visiting)

Topic: Democracy and Economic Change in Latin America

Spring 2011

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Nancy Postero (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Unipolarity and its Discontents

Professor: Patrick Patterson (History)

Topic: The Muslim Experience in Contemporary European History

Professor: Kimber Quinney (Political Science, CSUSM)

Topic: A Comparative Analysis of Globalization

Professor: Peter Smith (Political Science)

Topic: Democracy in the Developing World

Professor: Kathryn Statler (SDSU)

Topic: Peace and War in the Modern Age

Professor: Michael Williams (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Politics in South Africa

Academic Year 2009-2010

Fall 2009

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Sharon Rose (Linguistics)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Unipolarity and Its Discontents

Professor: Kathryn Statler (SDSU)

Topic: Peace and War in the Modern Age

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Fowler (Political Science)

Winter 2010

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Nancy Postero (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: Issues of Economic (under)Development in Africa

Professor: Nancy Gilson (Political Science)

Topic: Immigration, Inclusion and Exclusion in the Civic Cultures of the US and Europe: Minorities, Citizenship and Rights

Professor: Theodore Groves (Economics)

Topic: International Economic Agreements

Professor: Mikkal Herberg (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

Topic: World Energy, Environment, and Geopolitics

Professor: Kwak, Nancy (History)

Topic: Housing in the Developing World

Professor: James Rauch (Economics)

Topic: The Political Economy of Globalization          

Spring 2010

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Prashant Bharadwaj (Economics)

Topic: Issues of Economic (under)Development in Africa

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Joel Johnson (Political Science)

Topic: International Governance and Political Development

Professor: Michael Provence (History)

Topic: Modern Middle East

Professor: Christina Schneider (Political Science)

Topic: The Politics of Cooperation

Professor: Peter Smith (Political Science)

Topic: Democracy in the Developing World

Professor: Michael Williams (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Politics in South Africa

Academic Year 2008-2009

Fall 2008

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Sharon Rose (Linguistics) & Eric Bakovich

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Robert Edelman (History)

Topic: The History of International Sport

Professor: Joerg Himmelreich (Visiting Professor)

Topic: Changing Rules of the Game

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Unipolarity and Its Discontents

Professor: Jeffrey Weintraub (Sociology)

Topic: War, Genocide, & Terrorism: The Sociology, Politics, and Moral Regulation of Violent Conflict

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Fowler (Political Science)

Winter 2009

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Stephan Haggard (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Marisa Abrajano (Political Science)

Topic: Political Incorporation, Immigration and Citizenship

Professor: William Chandler (Political Science)

Topic: The International Politics of Europe

Professor: Theodore Groves (Economics)

Topic: International Economic Agreements

Professor: Mikkal Herberg (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

Topic: World Energy, Environment, and Geopolitics

Professor: John Skrentny (Sociology)

Topic: Modernization and Globalization in East Asia

Professor: Kathryn Statler (SDSU)

Topic: Peace and War in the Modern Age

Professor: Graham Timmins (Political Science)

Topic: European Union Foreign and Security Policy

Professor: Karen Shelby (Political Science)

Topic: State Feminisms and Gendered Representations

Spring 2009

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Robert Cancel (Literature)

Topic: African Diaspora Cultural Production: Texts, Music and Film

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Nancy Gilson (Political Science)

Topic: Inclusion and Exclusion in the Civic Cultures of the US and Europe: Minorities, Culture and Liberal Democracy

Professor: Michael Provence (History)

Topic: Modern Middle East

Academic Year 2007-2008

Fall 2007

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Nancy Postero (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Theodore Groves (Economics)

Topic: International Economic Agreements

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Unipolarity and Its Discontents

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Fowler (Political Science)

Winter 2008

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Stephan Haggard (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Marisa Abrajano (Political Science)

Topic: Political Incorporation, Immigration and Citizenship

Professor: Robert Cancel (Literature)

Topic: Literatures of Struggle

Professor: Clark Gibson (Political Science)

Topic: Politics of Africa

Professor: James Samstad (Political Science, SDSU)

Topic: The Political Economy of Globalization

Spring 2008

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Maureen Feeley (Political Science)

Topic: Democracy in Global Perspective

Professor: Christine Hunefeldt (History)

Topic: Indigenous Movements, Indigenous Peoples

Professor: Marc-Andreas Muendler (Economics)

Topic: Understanding Globalization

Professor: Michael Provence (History)

Topic: Modern Middle East

Professor: James Samstad (Political Science, SDSU)

Topic: Democracy and Economic Liberalization in Latin America

Professor: Christena Turner (Sociology)

Topic: Culture, Power and Globalization in Asian Societies

Professor: Michael Williams (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Politics in South Africa

Academic Year 2006-2007

Fall 2006

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Nancy Postero (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Theodore Groves (Economics)

Topic: International Economic Agreements

Professor: Megumi Naoi (Political Science)

Topic: States, Markets, and Societies in East Asia

Professor: John Skrentny (Sociology)

Topic: Modernization and Globalization in East Asia

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Fowler (Political Science)

Winter 2007

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Stephan Haggard (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: William  Chandler (Political Science)

Topic: The International Politics of Europe

Professor: Arnaud Costinot (Economics)

Topic: Understanding Globalization

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Unipolarity and Its Discontents

Professor: James Samstad (Political Science, SDSU)

Topic: The Political Economy of Globalization

Professor: Michael Williams (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Politics in South Africa

Spring 2007

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Christena Turner (Sociology)

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Christine Hunefeldt (History)

Topic: Indigenous Movements, Indigenous Peoples

Professor: Michael Provence (History)

Topic: Modern Middle East

Professor: James Samstad (Political Science, SDSU)

Topic: Democracy and Economic Liberalization in Latin America

Professor: Hans Wendler (Visiting)

Topic: The European Union

Academic Year 2005-2006

Fall 2005

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Nancy Postero (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Sharon Rose (Linguistics)

Topic: Language Policy and Language Planning in Africa

Professor: Joel Robbins (Anthropology)

Topic: Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Clark Gibson (Political Science)

Winter 2006

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Stephan Haggard (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Everard Meade (History)

Topic: El Salvador and the United States

Professor: Megumi Naoi (Political Science)

Topic: States and Markets in East Asia

Professor: Pamela Radcliff (History)

Topic: Democratization: 20th Century Europe

Professor: Michael Williams (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Politics in South Africa

Spring 2006

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: James Coyle (Visitor, Chapman/Pepperdine)

Topic: National Security Strategy of the United States

Professor: Vidya Nadkarni (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Unipolarity and Its Discontents

Professor: Christena Turner (Sociology)

Topic: Culture, Power and Globalization in Asian Societies

Professor: David Forman-Barzilai (Political Science)

Topic: Jerusalem: An Interdisciplinary Study

Academic Year 2004-2005

Fall 2004

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Christena Turner (Sociology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Nathaniel Goetz (Visiting)

Topic: The Forced Migration Experience

INTL 190H – Honors Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Clark Gibson (Political Science)

Winter 2005

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Stephan Haggard (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Michael Provence (History)

Topic: Modern Middle East

Spring 2005

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Lisa Lowe (Literature)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Clark Gibson (Political Science, USD)

Topic: The China Dream

Professor: Sanford Lakoff (Political Science, USD)

Topic: Global Security after 9/11

Professor: Joel Robbins (Anthropology)

Topic: Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective

Academic Year 2003-2004

Fall 2003

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science)

Winter 2004

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Nancy Postero (Anthropology)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Clark Gibson (Political Science)

Topic: Theories of Democratization

Spring 2004

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Christine Hunefeldt (History)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Joel Robbins (Anthropology)

Topic: Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective

Academic Year 2002-2003

Fall 2002

Winter 2003

INTL 102 – Economics, Politics, and International Change

Professor: Lawrence Broz (Political Science)

Spring 2003

INTL 101 – Culture and Society in International Perspective

Professor: Lisa Lowe (Literature)

INTL 190 – Seminar in International Studies

Professor: Miles Kahler (School of Global Policy and Strategy)

Topic: Global, National, Local: The Influence of the Global System on National and Local Societies