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course offerings

Course Offerings

Note: The tentative schedule of course offerings is subject to change. Please check the Schedule of Classes.

All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better.  Should you have additional questions, please e-mail us at isp@ucsd.edu or send a message through the Virtual Advising Center.

2018 - 2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018 Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Summer 2019

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

 INTL 190

INTL Course Offerings

The International Studies Program offers courses throughout the academic year, including two core courses and the capstone seminar. All INTL courses must be taken at UCSD. All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better. 

To view previous INTL offerings, course descriptions, and syllabi, please visit INTL Course Offerings Archive.

Academic Year 2018-2019

Fall 2018

Course Name Faculty and Description

INTL 101

Culture and Society in International Perspective

Vargas, Manuel, Philosophy Department

Analysis of moral and political conflicts that arise in international contexts, through the lens of historical, philosophical, and literary sources. A recurring focus throughout will be on the challenges of understanding communities and values that are sometimes radically alien to one’s own. The conquest and colonization of the Americas will be used as a case study, with some emphasis on the nature, function, and fluidity of categories of identity, race, nationality, and culture. 

INTL 102

Economics, Politics, and International Change

Walter, Barbara, School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190H

Honors Seminar in International Studies

Gilson, Nancy, School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

INTL 190

Immigrant Exclusion Around the World

Adida, Claire, Political Science

 

INTL 190

The Political Economy of Globalization

Samstad, James, Political Science, SDSU

This seminar will examine both the positive and negative repercussions of the phenomenon known as “globalization.” It will begin with a discussion of the competing definitions of globalization, as well as its historical development and forces driving it. The seminar will then turn to some of the controversies and concrete impacts of greater economic and cultural exchange, along with discussions of how globalization has reshaped the role of the nation-state, and what, if anything, should be done to regulate the process of economic integration.

INTL 190

Technology, Music, and Festivals: How the Business is Shaped

Auerbach, Brad

This class will examine the massive changes that technology has had on the entertainment world, with a focus on the music business. We will examine how technology often shapes the art. By tracing the development of recorded music technology from the Gramophone to the LP to MP3, we will consider how musicians have worked with technology and how technology has shaped their music. We will look closely at the evolution of business models and how musicians are compensated. As such, we will examine the increasing role of the live concert experience for the musician, the fan, and the promoter. That will require analysis of relatively recent phenomena such as EDM, merchandise and the music festival. Each was unheard of in the age of Woodstock, but are completely expected at Coachella. The class will also examine the international influence of music, from several perspectives. We will examine the role of rock and roll and its ‘soft power’ in playing a seminal role in the collapse of the Iron Curtain. We will likewise look at the effect of ‘world music’ as it has come to permeate the listening preferences of people across borders, and how that has been accelerated by technology. Indeed, many music festivals are increasing including world music artists in the lineup. Finally, we will also examine the claims of many observers that internet startups like Facebook, Google and Amazon have shifted to themselves billions of dollars of value from musicians and other creators of content.

INTL 190

International Political Boundaries

Vidya, Nadkami, Political Science, USD

What do inter-state boundaries signify in twenty-first-century international politics? Do they represent lines of political and legal division separating citizens from foreigners or have boundaries been rendered invisible by the movement of people and trade across borders?Transnational challenges dealing with the environment, drugs, human migration, and terrorism do not stop at borders.  How may we conceptualize borders that serve both as lines of division and points of exchange? Drawing on historical examples from around the world, this will examine cross-border flows of people, goods, ideas, and all manner of natural and human-induced challenges.

INTL 190

Southeast Asia in the Global Economy

Samphantharak, Krislert, School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

This seminar course studies the interaction between Southeast Asian economies and the global economy in two aspects: (1) the roles of Southeast Asia in the global economy; and (2) how the global economy has affected the past and present economic development of the countries in this region. We will apply economic frameworks to study economic development, using the economies in this region as illustrated case studies.

INTL 190

Comparative Health Systems

Clemens, JeffreyEconomics, UCSD

The comparative study of international healthcare systems inevitably reveals intriguing contrasts, rooted from the individual country's unique set of economic and social values. How should countries organize and pay for healthcare? The relentless rise of health care costs requires global policymakers to confront precisely these questions.  This course takes a comparative approach to learn from the failures and successes of health systems around the world.  For your capstone research paper, you will conduct an in-depth exploration of a hot policy topic in the health system of your choice.

INTL 190

Global Access to Modern Medicine

Kshatriya, Krista, Lecturer

More than two billion people lack access to essential medicines.  This course will explore the connections between human rights, international law, trade, intellectual property, and global health, with a particular focus on how pharmaceuticals and medical technologies can effectively reach the world’s poor and marginalized populations.

INTL 190

Human Rights in Action

 Shafir, Gershon, Distinguished Professor, Sociology Department

We will examine and evaluate the role played by NGOs and global civil society in international human rights campaigns. We will examine in detail the campaigns to abolish slavery, torture, apartheid, and genocide, to regulate hostilities, and to endow prisoners of conscience and minorities with civil rights and women and children with civil and social rights.

Winter 2019

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Vitz, Matthew - History Department

Global Warming (or in broader terms, climate change) will be the greatest single challenge facing our world in the 21st century. One, in fact, could argue that climate change already is the greatest challenge we will face, even though it remains on the margins of public political discourse in most countries. This class seeks to interrogate the term "Anthropocene" by historicizing it and critically examining the economic models, social power, and inequalities that have given rise to and shaped this new era. You will learn about the utilitarian and conquest conceptions of nature that environmentalists have long sought to overturn, early preservation and conservation movements, the rise of modern environmentalism and ecological thinking, sustainable development paradigms, and environmental justice movements, among other ideas.

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Broz, Lawrence - Political Science Department

This course examines the evolution of the world economy from the late-19th century to the present. Our purpose is to describe the historical trends in the international economy and explain the causes and the consequences of these trends. We examine three periods: The Golden Age (1870-1913), which was the first modern era of economic globalization. The Golden Age came to an end with the Interwar Period (1919-1939), which saw nations abandon the world economy and turn inward behind high protectionist trade barriers and restrictions on international capital flows. The third period, Postwar Globalization (1945-2018), witnessed the gradual reemergence of the world economy, but that trend that is now threatened by crises in global finance and a rising tide of right-wing populism.

INTL 196H
Honors Seminar in International Studies

Gilson, Nancy - School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

INTL 190

Comparative Public Policy and Institutional Sources of Inequality

Feeley, MaureenPolitical Science

What do we mean by “democracy”? What are the dominant institutional forms of democracy in our world today, and what difference does this make for political representation and policy outcomes? This senior capstone seminar will introduce students to contemporary theoretical and empirical debates on democracy and democratization, with a specific focus on the relationship between political representation and economic inequality. For their thesis project, students will choose a contemporary problem of inequality of particular interest to them in a democratic, or democratizing, country of their choice (the United States may be used as a comparative case study), and analyze dominant political institutional sources of this problem.

INTL 190

When the West Meets the Rest: Travel Literature of Women and Men

Gilson, Nancy

TBD

INTL 190

Economics of Entrepreneurship

Tocoian, Oana

Despite the American mythology of the bold entrepreneur emerging like Venus from the sea of unfettered private markets, the US government has played a key role in stoking innovation and private enterprise, from incubating the venture capital industry, to aggressively subsidizing scientific research. Other successful industrial economies – most notably Japan, the Asian Tigers and most recently China – were even more visibly shaped by inspired central action. At the same time, many government interventions aimed at creating “the next Silicon Valley” – both in the US and abroad – have met with limited success or even been counterproductive. Thus, policy-making in the realm of entrepreneurship is a lot like fire: a necessary catalyst to evolution and a supremely useful tool, but not something to leave to reckless hand. We had better learn safe-handling practices.
 
In this course, we will first unpack the market failures that lead to a sub-optimal level of entrepreneurial activity in the absence of central coordination. Here we will study topics such as financing in credit constrained environments, innovation spillovers and market dynamics. Second, we will consider policy solutions -- from awarding intellectual property rights, to enforcing certain contracts, to facilitating access to credit and knowledge sharing, etc. In each case, we will use a combination of economic theory and empirical evidence to examine the potential benefits and drawbacks, in both the US and global contexts.

INTL 190

African American Internationalism

Graham, Jessica, History Department

In this course we will explore the ways in which African Americans have influenced and been influenced by international movements, ideologies, events, and leaders.  African Americans have long attempted to understand racial conditions in a global context, looking outside of national borders for solutions, ideas, and partners in the fight for equality.  Although the African Diaspora and Pan-Africanism played a major role, U.S. black internationalism has by no means been limited to the black experience, as many African American intellectuals, leaders, and average citizens have admired countries like Japan and Russia. African American internationalism was also not a one-way street, for U.S. blacks often had a powerful impact on changing social, political, and cultural conditions in other nations.

INTL 190

The Political Economy of Global Energy

Herberg, Mikkal, School of Global Policy & Strategy (GPS)

This course will analyze the geopolitics and economics of the global energy industry and markets. The themes will revolve around the search for energy security through cooperation or competition, the complex interaction between the economics and politics of energy markets, and the challenges of sustainable energy development. The course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of the global energy industry followed by a survey of the functioning of the global energy markets and investments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the oil industry due to its pivotal role in global energy use, pricing, and geopolitics. The course will analyze the concept of energy security and the politics of energy policy in today’s highly politicized, volatile energy markets. The focus will then turn to a survey of the nexus between energy and the environment, the concept of a sustainable energy development, and the political economy of carbon emissions and climate change.

INTL 190

States, Markets and Societies in East Asia

Naoi, Megumi, Political Science Department

The aim of this senior seminar is to help International Studies majors complete a major research project on the relationship among governments, markets, and societies in East Asia, broadly defined to include Northeast and Southeast Asia. Two questions motivate the course: (i) How do economic interest groups and social groups affect government policy? (ii) How do politics affect economic and social outcomes (e.g., economic growth, cross-border flows of goods, capital, and labor, gender equality, ethnic divisions etc)? Examples of topics that may be covered in the paper are industrial policy, trade, finance, gender, ethnic and racial politics, the environment, and migration. 

Spring 2019

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Gilson, Nancy - School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Haggard, Stephan - School of Global Policy & Strategy (GPS)

This course examines the evolution of the world economy from the late nineteenth century to the present. The purpose is to describe the historical trends in the international economy and explain the causes and the consequences of these trends. Students will come away with the basic tools they need to understand the world economy and the politics of international economic relations.

INTL 190

Corruption

Niehaus, Paul, Economics Department

The goal of the course is to better understand corruption in developing countries today: why it occurs, what the consequences are, and what can or should be done about it.

INTL 190

The Anatomy of the Deal

Auerbach, Brad

Brad Auerbach is a senior business executive with extensive and unique expertise in Intellectual Property law and licensing, business
development, marketing, and content acquisition for new technologies, on a global level. He has succeeded in structuring many groundbreaking
deals with a diverse range of rights holders, including NFL, HBO, MTV,
ESPN, etc. He has deep familiarity with each aspect of the media business, having sat on all sides of the deal-making table, on behalf of mobile, distribution and production companies. As a member of the California State Bar, Mr. Auerbach has held senior positions at HP, Qualcomm and Disney.This course will examine the issues that permeate the current technology and media landscape. As a means to reveal the ongoing challenges in this landscape, we will examine three industries that have undergone tectonic changes over the last few decades: music, video and computer. It is at the intersection of these industries that some of the most intriguing developments and hence the most innovative deals are being made. We will analyze several of these issues through an international lens, to examine nuances particular to certain territories.

INTL 190

National Security Strategy

Coyle, James, Chapman University

This course provides a review of the National Security Strategy of the United States. It pays particular attention to the elements of national power, and the role of International Law in the creation and maintenance of America's security and freedom, especially in light of transnational threats.

INTL 190

Transitions from Socialism to Democracy in Central & Eastern Europe

Major, Ivan, Lecturer

TBD

INTL 190

Trump, LePen and Liberal Democracy: Explaining Populist Parties in the United States and Europe

Fisk, David, Political Science

TBD

INTL 190

International Refugee Law and Policy

Kshatriya, Krista, Lecturer

International refugee policy determines the fate of 24 million displaced people and how the global community treats some of our most vulnerable members. In this course, we research the historical context, legal issues, and current policies impacting refugees around the world. In so doing, students will gain in-depth and interdisciplinary knowledge of: (1) refugee and asylum law, (2) the interaction of domestic and international institutions, and (3) the interplay between federal law, policy, and administration. This course also provides a foundation of legal studies through court case analysis and argument.

INTL 190

Topic TBD

 Clemens, JeffreyEconomics, UCSD

Course Description TBD

Departmental Course Offerings

Each quarter, the Schedule of Classes for the following quarter is released on Friday of Week 5. After the Schedule of Classes has posted, International Studies advisors will compile a list of approved International Studies courses offered by other departments to assist students in selecting appropriate courses. It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they are enrolled in courses that apply toward the their major requirements.

All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better with the exception of language courses which may be taken for pass/no pass.  These courses are subject to change, please refer to the UCSD Schedule of Classes for most accurate information. For course descriptions, please see the UCSD general catalog.

Academic Year 2018-2019

Fall 2018

Please review to the Schedule of Classes for most recent information.

Fall 2018 Departmental Course Offerings:

Interdisciplinary Electives

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better with the exception of language courses which may be taken for Pass/No Pass. It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.