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course offerings

Course Offerings

 

Summer 2020

INTL 101 and 102 are not offered during summer sessions

INTL 190

SS1: 2 Section | SS2: 2 Sections

(See course descriptions below) Offered Remotely

2020 - 2021 Tentative  Course Offerings

Fall 2020

Winter 2021

Spring 2021

Summer 2021

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

 To Be

Determined

Fall 2020 INTL Course Format

INTL 101 and INTL 102: Lectures for INTL 101 and 102 will be remote. Sections will be in-person and remote.  Section attendance and participation, even if asynchronous, will be required and graded.  See INTL Enrollment Information for information about prerequisites.

INTL 190. Senior Capstone Seminar: INTL 190 and INTL 190H will be remote. Enrollment is managed by the ISP Advisors. See INTL Enrollment Information for more details about enrollment process.

Important Information about INTL Courses

  • All INTL courses must be taken at UCSD. 
  • All INTL courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better. 
  • INTL 101 & 102 Prerequisties: Sophomore standing or above and completion of at least one quarter of a university-level writing course.
  • INTL 190 Prerequities: Senior standing; International Studies major; successful completion of INTL 101 and INTL 102 with a C- or better.
    • A "Pass" grade from Spring 2020 in INTL 101 and INTL 102 will be accepted.
  • Students should not enroll in an INTL course that conflicts with another course. Special accommodations will not be made if there are course conflicts. 

Note: The tentative schedule of course offerings is subject to change. Please check the Schedule of Classes.Should you have additional questions, please send a message through the Virtual Advising Center.

To view previous INTL offerings, course descriptions, and syllabi, please visit INTL Course Offerings Archive.

Enrollment for INTL 190: Enrollment will be managed by the International Studies Program to ensure seats are allocated to graduating students.  Students seeking enrollment should email isp@ucsd.edu


  • Summer 2020: All sections of INTL 190 are full.
  • Fall 2020:  Enrollment form was sent out to eligible students and seats have been allocated. See INTL Enrollment Information.

Summer 2020

Course Name Faculty

INTL 190 - Summer Session 1  - Section A00

Beyond the Drug War: Truth, Justice, and Human Rights in Mexico

Lettieri, Michael - Center for U.S. Mexican Studies

Over the past decade, Mexico has faced an unprecedented wave of violence. The death toll tops 150,000, and more than 40,000 people have gone missing. To end this human rights crisis, we must understand how it emerged from a decades-long drug war, shaped by domestic and international forces, and how it has been perpetuated by local cycles of violence. We must also understand the ways in which Mexico’s journalists and activists have struggled to confront narcoculture, corruption, and violence, and to build peace in the country. This course offers a nuanced look at modern Mexico, exploring issues of democracy, peacebuilding, memory, and human rights.

INTL 190 - Summer Session 1  - Section B00

 Politics in the Philippines

Segui, Alan - University of San Diego 

The purpose of this course is to explore the Philippine Political System as it has gone through a transformation since the mid-1980s, after the People Power Revolution and the subsequent downfall of the Ferdinand Marcos regime. This course will investigate the moral struggles of achieving democracy, maintaining political stability, mitigating social inequality, and presidential leadership and management.  This course will analyze the impact of social class, language, education, and the factors that have facilitated or impeded democratization, good governance, and economic modernization.

INTL 190 - Summer Session 2 - Section A00

Climate Justice

Gagnon, Jeffrey - Warren Writing Program Director

Climate change is real, and the impacts of climate disruption are already being felt across the global. As the 2017 Paris Climate Agreement made clear, some nations around the world are preparing to meet the challenges of a carbon-neutral future. However, the poorest and most politically vulnerable populations around the world will disproportionately bear the greatest consequences. Is this just? Is it fair? Do the developed nations and people that are most responsible for climate change have an ethical obligation to address climate disruption on behalf of those less fortunate? If so, what should those responsibilities be and how should they be implemented?

INTL 190 - Summer Session 2 - Section B00

Beyond the Drug War: Truth, Justice, and Human Rights in Mexico

Lettieri, Michael - Center for U.S. Mexican Studies

Over the past decade, Mexico has faced an unprecedented wave of violence. The death toll tops 150,000, and more than 40,000 people have gone missing. To end this human rights crisis, we must understand how it emerged from a decades-long drug war, shaped by domestic and international forces, and how it has been perpetuated by local cycles of violence. We must also understand the ways in which Mexico’s journalists and activists have struggled to confront narcoculture, corruption, and violence, and to build peace in the country. This course offers a nuanced look at modern Mexico, exploring issues of democracy, peacebuilding, memory, and human rights.

Fall 2020

Course Name Faculty

INTL 101

Culture and Society in International Perspective

Day, Joel - School of Global Policy and Strategy

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 102

Economics, Politics, and International Change

 

Walter, Barbara - School of Gobal Policy and Strategy

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.
In this course we will examine the history, politics and poetics of Israeli-Palestinian conflict and peace-seeking. We will explore these topics through the lens of conflict resolution theory and practice, emphasizing personal and collective narratives and identity.

INTL 190 - Section A00

Political Econonomy of Southeast Asia

Ravanilla, Nico - School of Global Policy & Strategy

This seminar course examines the interaction between politics and economic development of the countries in Southeast Asia. The purpose is to understand the impediments to economic development and why some states in SEA have been able to overcome these impediments while others have not. Students will come away with tools of comparative analysis and political economy they need to understand more broadly why some nations fail and others succeed, using Southeast Asia and its nations as case studies.

INTL 190 - Section B00

International Political Boundries

Nadkarni, Vidya - USD

What do inter-state boundaries signify in twenty-first-century international politics? Do they represent lines of political and legal division separating citizens from foreigners or have boundaries been rendered invisible by the movement of people and trade across borders?Transnational challenges dealing with the environment, drugs, human migration, and terrorism do not stop at borders. How may we conceptualize borders that serve both as lines of division and points of exchange? Drawing on historical examples from around the world, this will examine cross-border flows of people, goods, ideas, and all manner of natural and human-induced challenges.

INTL 190 - Section C00

Technology, Music, and Festivals: How the Business is Shaped

Auerbach, Brad - Visiting

This class will examine the massive changes that technology has had on the entertainment world, with a focus on the music business. We will examine how technology often shapes the art. By tracing the development of recorded music technology from the Gramophone to the LP to MP3, we will consider how musicians have worked with technology and how technology has shaped their music. We will look closely at the evolution of business models and how musicians are compensated. As such, we will examine the increasing role of the live concert experience for the musician, the fan, and the promoter. That will require analysis of relatively recent phenomena such as EDM, merchandise and the music festival. Each was unheard of in the age of Woodstock, but are completely expected at Coachella. The class will also examine the international influence of music, from several perspectives. We will examine the role of rock and roll and its ‘soft power’ in playing a seminal role in the collapse of the Iron Curtain. We will likewise look at the effect of ‘world music’ as it has come to permeate the listening preferences of people across borders, and how that has been accelerated by technology. Indeed, many music festivals are increasing including world music artists in the lineup. Finally, we will also examine the claims of many observers that internet startups like Facebook, Google and Amazon have shifted to themselves billions of dollars of value from musicians and other creators of content.

INTL 190 - Section D00

Drug Wars, Peacebuilding, and Human Rights in Mexico

Lettieri, Michael - Center for U.S. Mexican Studies

Over the past decade, Mexico has faced an unprecedented wave of violence. The death toll tops 150,000, and more than 40,000 people have gone missing. To end this human rights crisis, we must understand how it emerged from a decades-long drug war, shaped by domestic and international forces, and how it has been perpetuated by local cycles of violence. We must also understand the ways in which Mexico’s journalists and activists have struggled to confront narcoculture, corruption, and violence, and to build peace in the country. This course offers a nuanced look at modern Mexico, exploring issues of democracy, peacebuilding, memory, and human rights.

INTL 190 - Section E00

International Refugee Law and Policy

Kshatriya, Krista - Visiting

International refugee policy determines the fate of 24 million displaced people and how the global community treats some of our most vulnerable members. In this course, we research the historical context, legal issues, and current policies impacting refugees around the world. In so doing, students will gain in-depth and interdisciplinary knowledge of: (1) refugee and asylum law, (2) the interaction of domestic and international institutions, and (3) the interplay between federal law, policy, and administration. This course also provides a foundation of legal studies through court case analysis and argument.

INTL 190 - Section F00

Media systems in the post-truth/post-factual political age

Lazitski-Torres, Olga

"This senior seminar explores the new political age of “post-truth” that we live in today and the ways in which societies in different parts of the world respond to its challenges. In 2016, the Oxford Dictionaries chose “post-truth” the word of the year. This adjective was defined as “relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief”. Spanish word “posverdad,” Mandarin word “hòu zhēnxiàng,” Russian word “пост-правда,” German word “postfaktisch” captured the same meaning and became widespread within the discourses of the national public spheres.
We will begin the course by examining the concepts of the “post-truth” era and “post-factual” age. We unpack their key components, exploring the following questions in philosophy: Is there such a thing as truth? What it truth? What is fact? What is evidence? What is knowledge? How do I know that objective reality exists and it is not just a projection of my subjective consciousness? We will look closely at the emergence of “post-truth” and the role of ideology and lies in different political regimes (such as neo-liberal Western regimes, authoritarian regimes of Russia and China, and Latin American populist regimes). We will explore the “post-truth” implications in both politics and media in different parts of the world. We will learn the concepts of communicative abundance, filter bubble, confirmation and cognitive biases, framing, belief, opinion and try to understand their relationships with the concepts of fact, truth and evidence. Using case studies from the U.S., Europe, Russia, China, and Latin America, we will analyze how journalism has been reimagined in a “post-truth” world and how journalists within different media systems are dealing with the challenges of the post-factual age."

INTL 190 - Section G00

Borderlands and Frontiers in Latin America

 

Amie Campos

This course explores the creation of borders and frontiers in Latin America from the colonial period into the 20th century. Our study will be driven by questions that will explore how frontier regions evolved throughout important periods in Latin American history. How were these borders created, and what were the political, economic, and social consequences of these processes? How were borders impacted by colonialism, nationalism, and race relations? How did people transform, negotiate, and shape the landscape of border regions in Latin America? Our study of the experiences of different social groups in these frontier regions will ultimately enable us to make a broader analysis of the evolution of state formation in the region.

INTL 190 - Section H00

Inequality: Impact, Mechansisms, and Strategies

Dani Yin

Economic and social inequality continues to grow and has become even more pronounced during the COVID-19 crisis. This course will review the impact of inequality in educational and organizational contexts, discuss its psychological mechanisms, and develop strategies to reduce inequality using insights from psychology and other behavioral science research.

INTL 190H

Honors Seminar/INTL Studies

Gibson, Clark - Political Science

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.