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Course Offerings

Note: The tentative schedule of course offerings is subject to change. Please check the Schedule of Classes.

All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better.  Should you have additional questions, please e-mail us at isp@ucsd.edu or send a message through the Virtual Advising Center.

2017 - 2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017 Winter 2018 Spring 2018 Summer 2018

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 190

 SSI: INTL 190

SSII: INTL 190

2018 - 2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018 Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Summer 2019

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

INTL 101

INTL 102

INTL 190

 TBD

INTL Course Offerings

The International Studies Program offers courses throughout the academic year, including two core courses and the capstone seminar.  All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better. 

To view previous INTL offerings, course descriptions, and syllabi, please visit INTL Course Offerings Archive.

Academic Year 2017-2018

Fall 2017

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Walter, Barbara, School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190H
Honors Seminar in International Studies

Gilson, Nancy,School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

INTL 190
Tech, Music, Festivals: How the Business is Shaped

Bradford Auerbach

This class will examine the massive changes that technology has had on the entertainment world, with a focus on the music business. We will examine how technology often shapes the art. By tracing the development of recorded music technology from the Gramophone to the LP to MP3, we will consider how musicians have worked with technology and how technology has shaped their music.

We will look closely at the evolution of business models and how musicians are compensated. As such, we will examine the increasing role of the live concert experience for the musician, the fan and the promoter. That will require analysis of relatively recent phenomena such as EDM, merchandise and the music festival. Each were unheard of in the age of Woodstock, but are completely expected at Coachella.

The class will also examine the international influence of music, from several perspectives. We will examine the role of rock and roll and its ‘soft power’ in playing a seminal role in the collapse of the Iron Curtain. We will likewise look at the effect of ‘world music’ as it has come to permeate the listening preferences of people across borders, and how that has been accelerated by technology. Indeed, many music festivals are increasingly including world music artists in the lineup.

Finally, we will also examine the claims of many observers that internet startups like Facebook, Google and Amazon have shifted to themselves billions of dollars of value from musicians and other creators of content.

INTL 190
Comparative Health Systems

Clemens, Jeffrey, Economics Department

The comparative study of international healthcare systems inevitably reveals intriguing contrasts, rooted from the individual country's unique set of economic and social values. How should countries organize and pay for health care? The relentless rise of health care costs requires global policy makers to confront precisely these questions.  This course takes a comparative approach to learn from the failures and successes of health systems around the world.  For your capstone research paper, you will conduct an in depth exploration of a hot policy topic in the health system of your choice.

INTL 190
Globalization, Nationalism, and the Future of Liberal Democracy

Samstad, James,Political Science, San Diego State University

This seminar will examine both the positive and negative repercussions of the phenomenon known as “globalization.” It will begin with a discussion of the competing definitions of globalization, as well as its historical development and forces driving it. The seminar will then turn to some of the controversies and concrete impacts of greater economic and cultural exchange, along with discussions of how globalization has reshaped the role of the nation-state, and what, if anything, should be done to regulate the process of economic integration.

INTL 190
Contemporary Political & Policy Changes in Latin America

Desposato, Scott, Political Science Department

Over the last 20 years, Latin American countries have largely consolidated stable and apparently sustainable democracies, and have solved many of the structural problems that led to cycles of growth, crisis, and collapse through most of the 20th century. Yet these regimes face a series of broad challenges to their legitimacy and success, many without clear solutions or paths forward. The issues are contentious and critical, and will be central to political struggles this century. In this class, we will examine and debate critical issues. We have three main objectives: 1) to identify and understand the complexities of these issues; 2) to debate the merits of varied strategies for addressing these issues; and 3) to conduct basic research which may can contribute to political science and policy debates.

INTL 190
African American Internationalism

Graham, Jessica, History Department

In this course we will explore the ways in which African Americans have influenced and been influenced by international movements, ideologies, events, and leaders.  African Americans have long attempted to understand racial conditions in a global context, looking outside of national borders for solutions, ideas, and partners in the fight for equality.  Although the African Diaspora and Pan-Africanism played a major role, U.S. black internationalism has by no means been limited to the black experience, as many African American intellectuals, leaders, and average citizens have admired countries like Japan and Russia. African American internationalism was also not a one-way street, for U.S. blacks often had a powerful impact on changing social, political, and cultural conditions in other nations.

INTL 190
Southeast Asia in the Global Economy

Samphantharak, Krislert, School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

This seminar course studies the interaction between Southeast Asian economies and the global economy in two aspects: (1) the roles of Southeast Asia in the global economy; and (2) how the global economy has affected the past and present economic development of the countries in this region. We will apply economic frameworks to study economic development, using the economies in this region as illustrated case studies.

Winter 2018

INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Vitz, Matthew, History Department

Preliminary course description: Global Warming (or in broader terms, climate change) will be the greatest single challenge facing our world in the 21st century. One, in fact, could argue that climate change already is the greatest challenge we will face, even though it remains on the margins of public political discourse in most countries. This class seeks to interrogate the term "Anthropocene" by historicizing it and critically examining the economic models, social power, and inequalities that have given rise to and shaped this new era. You will learn about the utilitarian and conquest conceptions of nature that environmentalists have long sought to overturn, early preservation and conservation movements, the rise of modern environmentalism and ecological thinking, sustainable development paradigms, and environmental justice movements, among other ideas.

Syllabus

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Haggard, Stephan, School of Global Policy & Strategy (GPS)

This course examines the evolution of the world economy from the late nineteenth century to the present. The purpose is to describe the historical trends in the international economy and explain the causes and the consequences of these trends. Students will come away with the basic tools they need to understand the world economy and the politics of international economic relations.

Syllabus

INTL 190
Comparative Public Policy and Institutional Sources of Inequality

 

Feeley, Maureen, Political Science

What do we mean by “democracy”?  What are the dominant institutional forms of democracy in our world today, and what difference does this make for political representation and policy outcomes?  This senior capstone seminar will introduce students to contemporary theoretical and empirical debates on democracy and democratization, with a specific focus on the relationship between political representation and economic inequality.  For their thesis project, students will choose a contemporary problem of inequality of particular interest to them in a democratic, or democratizing, country of their choice (the United States may be used as a comparative case study), and analyze dominant political institutional sources of this problem. 

Syllabus

INTL 190
Strangers in a Strange Land - Novels and Travel Writing

Gilson, Nancy, School of Global Policy & Strategy (GPS)

Why do we travel and, most especially, why do the most serious travelers (not vacationers) prefer to travel by themselves, seeking out places that will point out exactly how alone they are? They arrive with no suitable language, little idea of what they will find, and with the brightest hope that they will discover both the truth about the place and the truth about themselves in that place. But, the great American writer, Herman Melville cautions such a traveler when he describes a far off island that is home to one of the sailors in Moby Dick: “It is not down on any map; true places never are.”

In this course, we will read travel essays, memoirs, and novels, all written before the resort to a Rough Guide and the internet. What happens when “outsiders” choose to go into the desert in search of an oasis? When they look for the “lost heart” of someplace they have never been? How do they write about what they do not know and, for lack of language, cannot understand? And how has this writing shaped what the rest of us think we know about places we have never been? We will read literature on Africa, Europe, Latin America, the US, and Asia.

INTL 190
The Economics of Discrimination

Bharadwaj, Prashant, Economics

INTL 190
Topics of Economic Development

Bharadwaj, Prashant, Economics

INTL 190
The Political Economy of Global Energy

Herberg, Mikkal, School of Global Policy & Strategy (GPS)

This course will analyze the geopolitics and economics of the global energy industry and markets. The themes will revolve around the search for energy security through cooperation or competition, the complex interaction between the economics and politics of energy markets, and the challenges of sustainable energy development. The course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of the global energy industry followed by a survey of the functioning of the global energy markets and investments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the oil industry due its pivotal role in global energy use, pricing, and geopolitics. The course will analyze the concept of energy security and the politics of energy policy in today’s highly politicized, volatile energy markets. The focus will then turn to a survey of the nexus between energy and the environment, the concept of a sustainable energy development, and the political economy of carbon emissions and climate change.

INTL 190
Autocracy, Democracy and Prosperity

Saiegh, Sebastian, Political Science

This course considers the interplay between factor endowments, political institutions and economic performance. It focuses on the connection between representative political institutions and the emergence and expansion of markets.

Syllabus

INTL 190
Trump, LePen and Liberal Democracy: Explaining Populist Parties in the United States and Europe

Fisk, David, Political Science

Throughout the last decade, candidates (and political parties) espousing populist agendas have become increasingly visible in several advanced industrial democracies. Although the presence of candidates (or parties) invoking populist messaging is not a “new” phenomenon in developed democratic systems, the political success of this messaging appears to be a “new” phenomenon and has had important ramifications for several political systems (e.g., Trump election in the United States, success of Marine Le Pen in “re-branding” the National Front in France, entry of the Alternative for Germany into the German parliament, etc.) and has also impacted international politics (e.g., the British referendum to leave the European Union). This seminar seeks a greater understanding of this phenomenon by: defining populism, investigating how populist parties (on the right and left) form, analyzing how populist parties compete electorally, evaluating how governments and mainstream parties typically respond to these parties, and discussing the challenges these parties create for modern liberal democracies. Although we will be examining the rise of populism in the American political system, this seminar will adopt a comparative approach which will also focus on the experience of other advanced industrial democracies, paying particular attention to the European political experience. 

Syllabus

INTL 190
Global Access to Modern Medicine

Kshatriya, Krista, Lecturer

More than two billion people lack access to essential medicines.  This course will explore the connections between human rights, international law, trade, intellectual property, and global health, with a particular focus on how pharmaceuticals and medical technologies can effectively reach the world’s poor and marginalized populations.

Spring 2018

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Gilson, Nancy,School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 190
Corruption

Niehaus, Paul, Economics Department

The goal of the course is to better understand corruption in  developing countries today: why it occurs, what the consequences are, and what can or should be done about it.  We will draw on readings from economics, political science and sociology, and from Dr. Niehaus' work advising emerging market governments and building GiveDirectly and Segovia.

INTL 190
The Anatomy of a Deal

Auerbach, Bradford

This course will examine the issues that permeate the current technology and media landscape. As a means to reveal the ongoing challenges in this landscape, we will examine three industries that have undergone tectonic changes over the last few decades: music, video and computer. It is at the intersection of these industries that some of the most intriguing developments and hence the most innovative deals are being made. We will analyze several of these issues through an international lens, to examine nuances particular to certain territories.

INTL 190
National Security Strategy

Coyle, James, Visiting Professor, Chapman University

This course provides a review of the National Security Strategy of the United States.  It pays particular attention to the elements of national power, and the role of International Law in the creation and maintenance of America's security and freedom, especially in light of transnational threats.

INTL 190
Transitions from Socialism to Democracy in Central & Eastern Europe
Major, Ivan, Lecturer
INTL 190
African American Internationalism

Graham, Jessica, History Department

In this course we will explore the ways in which African Americans have influenced and been influenced by international movements, ideologies, events, and leaders.  African Americans have long attempted to understand racial conditions in a global context, looking outside of national borders for solutions, ideas, and partners in the fight for equality.  Although the African Diaspora and Pan-Africanism played a major role, U.S. black internationalism has by no means been limited to the black experience, as many African American intellectuals, leaders, and average citizens have admired countries like Japan and Russia. African American internationalism was also not a one-way street, for U.S. blacks often had a powerful impact on changing social, political, and cultural conditions in other nations.

INTL 190
International Refugee Law and Policy

Kshatriya, Krista, Lecturer

International refugee policy determines the fate of 24 million displaced people and how the global community treats some of our most vulnerable members. In this course, we research the historical context, legal issues, and current policies impacting refugees around the world. In so doing, students will gain in-depth and interdisciplinary knowledge of: (1) refugee and asylum law, (2) the interaction of domestic and international institutions, and (3) the interplay between federal law, policy, and administration. This course also provides a foundation of legal studies through court case analysis and argument.

INTL 190
Peace and War in the Modern Age

Statler, Kathryn, Lecturer

The central theme of this course is the seemingly contradictory nature of the 20th century. On the one hand, humankind took momentous steps toward recognizing universal human rights and attempting to ensure peace and security for nations and citizens. On the other hand, the twentieth century witnessed not one but two world wars, a Cold War that lasted forty-five years, and horrendous violations of human rights, not to mention massive loss of life. How do we reconcile this contradiction? Ultimately, we will be looking at getting to peace through war.

Summer 2018

Course Name Faculty and Description

Summer Session 1:

INTL 190
Democracy and Economic Change in Latin America

Faculty and Description TBA

Summer Session 2:

INTL 190
Sports and Social Justice

Faculty and Description TBA

Academic Year 2018-2019

Fall 2018

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Vargas, Manuel, Philosophy Department

 

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Walter, Barbara, School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Examination of the domestic and international sources of economic and political change. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, comparative economic development, authoritarian and democratic regimes, international and civil conflict, globalization and its domestic and international implications.

INTL 190H
Honors Seminar in International Studies

Gilson, Nancy,School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

INTL 190
Seminar in International Studies

Faculty and Description TBA

Winter 2019

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Vitz, Matthew - History Department

 

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Broz, Lawrence - Political Science Department

INTL 196H
Honors Seminar in International Studies

Gilson, Nancy - School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Seminar required of all honors students in International Studies. Honors Program Application required for enrollment in this course.

INTL 190
Seminar in International Studies

Faculty and Description TBA

Spring 2019

Course Name Faculty and Description
INTL 101
Culture and Society in International Perspective

Gilson, Nancy - School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Analysis of the cultural and social developments of the modern era from the perspective of interaction among societies. Particular attention is paid to the definition, representation, and the negotiation of social and cultural boundaries over time.

INTL 102
Economics, Politics, and International Change

Haggard, Stephan - School of Global Policy & Strategy (GPS)

This course examines the evolution of the world economy from the late nineteenth century to the present. The purpose is to describe the historical trends in the international economy and explain the causes and the consequences of these trends. Students will come away with the basic tools they need to understand the world economy and the politics of international economic relations.

INTL 190
Seminar in International Studies

Faculty and Description TBA

Departmental Course Offerings: Academic Year 2017-2018

Each quarter, the Schedule of Classes for the following quarter is released on Friday of Week 5. After the Schedule of Classes has posted, International Studies advisors will compile a list of approved International Studies courses offered by other departments to assist students in selecting appropriate courses. It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they are enrolled in courses that apply toward the International Studies major.

All courses must be taken for a letter grade C- or better.  These courses are subject to change, please reer to the UCSD Schedule of Classes for most accurate information. For course descriptions, please see the UCSD general catalog.

Fall 2017

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Fall 2017 Departmental Course Offerings:

Winter 2018

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Winter 2018 Departmental Course Offerings:

Spring 2018

All courses must be taken for a letter grade of C- or better.  It is the responsibility of each student to verify that they have enrolled in the correct courses as set forth by the International Studies Major Requirements.

Spring 2018 Departmental Course Offerings:

Summer 2018

A preview of Summer 2018 Courses is now available.  The preview of courses is updated frequently.  This is only a guide and not the final list of Summer 2018 courses.

Archives

To view previous INTL offerings, course descriptions, and syllabi, please visit INTL Course Offerings Archive.

Academic Year 2016-2017

Summer 2017 Departmental Course Offerings:


Spring 2017 Departmental Course Offerings:


Winter 2017 Departmental Course Offerings:


Fall 2016 Departmental Course Offerings:

Study Abroad
UCDS/UCCS
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Contact

Office Location:
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Phone: (858) 822-5299
Email: isp@ucsd.edu

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